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Report of Contraceptive Use among Latina Women: Women's Health Issues Publishes Grant Funded Report

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January 11, 1999, Washington, DC - The November/December 1998 issue (v8:6) of Women's Health Issues has published findings from the fourth annual Jacobs Institute of Women's Health & Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical Scholar Award. Jennifer B. Unger, PhD, of the University of Southern California School of Medicine was chosen in 1997 to receive the $30,000 award to explore the determining factors of contraceptive use among Latina women. Gregory B. Molina, BA is her co-author.

Unger and Molina studied several variables, and found those that have a significant association with contraception use include social support for contraceptive use, no desire for additional sons, contraceptive use self efficacy (certainty of birth control usage), and low acculturation. They found Latina women might be more likely to use effective contraception if they perceive that their friends and family members approve of contraception use. The data also suggested that family planning programs could help them to increase their contraceptive use self-efficacy by addressing the numerous logistical, social, and economic barriers to effective contraception.

The study was conducted among 291 Latina women, ages 15 through 50 years, who were recruited from ob-gyn clinics in Los Angeles. The majority of the women were born outside the United States and had less than a high school education. More than two-thirds reported that they or their partner used a contraceptive every time they had sex.

The Jacobs Institute of Women's Health is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the knowledge, practice, and understanding of women's health care. Women's Health Issues, edited by Warren H. Pearse, MD, FACOG, is the official, bimonthly publication of the Jacobs Institute. Copies of the November/December 1998 issue (v8:6) are available from the Jacobs Institute for $21.50 each, plus $3.50 shipping and handling (click here for more information).

Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, a member of the Johnson & Johnson family of companies, is a leader in women's health care. The company makes and markets prescription products in several therapeutic categories, including womens health, central nervous system, infectious diseases, pain management, and wound healing.

Finding ways to improve the delivery of health care services for women is the focus of the annual Jacobs Institute & Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical Scholar award. Research that considers the changing health care environment, the unmet need for primary and preventive health services, the historic lack of research on women's health, and the importance of social, cultural, legal, economic, and behavioral factors influencing the financing and delivery of health care to women is eligible. The application deadline for the 2000 award is October 15, 2000. (Click here for more information.)

For more information on the grant or to order a copy of Womens Health Issues, November/December 1998 issue, please contact the Jacobs Institute at (202) 863-4990, (202) 488-4229 Fax, 409 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024-2188.

For photos, interviews, or information, contact Shannon R. Mouton at the Jacobs Institute, phone: 202-863-4989; E-mail: .

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For Immediate Release

For more information contact:
Shannon R. Mouton
The Jacobs Institute
(202) 863-4989